Brief account of the devastation of the indies

In truth, I believe without trying to deceive myself that the number of the slain is more like fifteen million. Only a small percentage of the gold they took was given to the Spanish purse.

His text largely uses an emotionally persuasive argument instead of a logical argument in A Short Account in his effort to convince the King of Spain. From that time onward the Indians began to seek ways to throw the Christians out of their lands. And never have the Indians in all the Indies committed any act against the Spanish Christians, until those Christians have first and many times committed countless cruel aggressions against them or against neighboring nations.

The reason why De Las Casas did not mention the number of indigenous deaths caused by old world diseases is not a political one. More importantly to the king, the conquistadors who took gold from the natives only sent a tiny amount back to the Spanish royal treasury, keeping most of the gold for themselves.

The professed purpose of the Spanish conquistadors in the Caribbean and Central America had been to convert heathen inhabitants to Christianity; yet, Bartolome points out that the true motive appears to be to accumulate wealth in gold.

They are also poor people, for they not only possess little but have no desire to possess worldly goods. The Spaniards were guilty of massacres, rape, and even infanticide.

Sadly, the Spaniards in return used the gentleness and generosity of the natives to easily plunder the natives' villages, enslave the natives, and collect all their gold and jewels.

With these infernal methods of tyranny they debase and weaken countless numbers of those pitiful Indian nations. When the Spaniards saw that some of these had escaped, they sent a ship to find them, and it voyaged for three years among the islands searching for those who had escaped being slaughteredfor a good Christian had helped them escape, taking pity on them and had won them over to Christ; of these there were eleven persons and these I saw.

De Las Casas' A Short Account, was a revised history of the conquest, in the way that he includes facts that would aid him in his argument.

What is a summary of A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de las Casas?

And also, those lands are so rich and felicitous, the native peoples so meek and patient, so easy to subject, that our Spaniards have no more consideration for them than beasts. And also, those lands are so rich and felicitous, the native peoples so meek and patient, so easy to subject, that our Spaniards have no more consideration for them than beasts.

However, this generosity was their custom and the Spaniards could count on it. Their repasts are such that the food of the holy fathers in the desert can scarcely be more parsimonious, scanty, and poor.

Inafter Las Casas first wrote the chronicle later known as A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, during the hearings ordered by Charles I of Spain to resolve issues of forceful conversion and colonial exploitation of Indians, Las Casas presented the account before the members of the Council of the Indies as proof of atrocities committed upon Indians by colonial authorities.

The milk in the breasts of the women with infants dried up and thus in a short while the infants perished. It is important to look at A Short Account as an important observation of what was happening to the indigenous people at the hands of the Spanish conquistadors, instead of only looking at it as an example of rhetoric or propaganda.

A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de las Casas

Project Gutenberg believes the Court has no jurisdiction over the matter, but until the issue is resolved during appeal, it will comply. They are by nature the most humble, patient, and peaceable, holding no grudges, free from embroilments, neither excitable nor quarrelsome.

For this reason they are not arrogant, embittered, or greedy. And all the land so far discovered is a beehive of people; it is as though God had crowded into these lands the great majority of mankind.

Though the suffering and death continued in the Spanish Caribbean islands, Bartolome never let go of his commitment to saving the natives.

Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies Essay

And I say this from my own knowledge of the acts I witnessed. But I should not say "than beasts" for, thanks be to God, they have treated beasts with some respect; I should say instead like excrement on the public squares.

And because they are so weak and complaisant, they are less able to endure heavy labor and soon die of no matter what malady. The professed purpose of the Spanish conquistadors in the Caribbean and Central America had been And some of the Indians concealed their foods while others concealed their wives and children and still others fled to the mountains to avoid the terrible transactions of the Christians.

They have the healthiest lands in the world, where lived more than five hundred thousand souls; they are now deserted, inhabited by not a single living creature. Then they behaved with such temerity and shamelessness that the most powerful ruler of the islands had to see his own wife raped by a Christian officer.

Then, when they have slain all those who fought for their lives or to escape the tortures they would have to endure, that is to say, when they have slain all the native rulers and young men since the Spaniards usually spare only the women and children, who are subjected to the hardest and bitterest servitude ever suffered by man or beastthey enslave any survivors.

However, the mere injustice that occurred with the lives of innocent people was not enough to spur the nobles in Spain to action. More than thirty other islands in the vicinity of San Juan are for the most part and for the same reason depopulated, and the land laid waste.

Nor to either the men or the women did they give any food except herbs and legumes, things of little substance. And of all the infinite universe of humanity, these people are the most guileless, the most devoid of wickedness and duplicity, the most obedient and faithful to their native masters and to the Spanish Christians whom they serve.

And the Christians attacked them with buffets and beatings, until finally they laid hands on the nobles of the villages. The repartimiento or distribution was made according to the rank and importance of the Christian to whom the Indians were allocated, one of them being given thirty, another forty, still another, one or two hundred, and besides the rank of the Christian there was also to be considered in what favor he stood with the tyrant they called Governor.

De Las Casas supported the overall Spanish colonial experiment in the Americas, while condemning the abuse of the indigenous people. And they committed other acts of force and violence and oppression which made the Indians realize that these men had not come from Heaven.

A Brief Account of the Destruction of the by Bartolome de las Casas The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies, by Bartolome de las Casas This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no.

Based off of this reading, it can be assumed that the conditions in the Indies during the time this text was written were not humane whatsoever. A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies was written with the task of informing the King of Spain about the murder and gold hoarding that was occurring in the New World.

The purpose of the expeditions was primarily to convert the natives to Christianity and save them from eternal damnation. Bartolomé de las Casas A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE INDIES writtenpublished * [EXCERPTS] PRESENTATION by Bishop don Fray Bartolomé de las Casas or Casaus, to the most high and potent lord Prince of all the Spains don Felipe, our.

The Devastation of the Indies: A Brief Account [Bartolomé De Las Casas, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Herma Briffault] on schmidt-grafikdesign.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying schmidt-grafikdesign.coms: A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de las Casas.

No cover available. Download; Bibrec; Bibliographic Record. Author: Casas, Bartolomé de las, Title: A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies Or, a faithful NARRATIVE OF THE Horrid and Unexampled Massacres, Butcheries, and all manner of Cruelties.

Brief account of the devastation of the indies
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Bartoleme de Las Casas, Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies